Go to How Not to Build an Addition Index! This page includes notes on insurance coverage.

WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN INSURANCE COVERAGE

Many employers provide insurance coverage. In the standard arrangement the employer pays a flat amount of the premium and the employee pays the rest. An employee who gets a skimpy plan pays nothing or even gets money back. If the worker gets a fat plan, he pays extra.

Before my accident I was seldom ill. I never saw a visible product or service in exchange for my insurance premium. I had a notion that someone was pocketing dollars I could have been putting in my own pocket. For this reason, I paid the lowest possible premium and got the lowest level of coverage. At the time, I was glad for the extra cash. I spent it on the usual stuff: groceries, house payments and my ever expanding collection of Lego toys. Then this series of bills from the hospital hit. Naturally, I kept track of the costs. I also figured how much I had saved over the last fifteen years by going with the cheap plan. When I added it all together, I found I had broken even.

To be able to work on an addition in reckless abandon with a degree of security, I now recommend the best coverage available. Health Maintenance Organizations are good. If possible, get a health rider that also covers anyone who comes on your property while you are working. In my case, I have coverage for anyone that comes within range of a nail gun.

Finally, the policy should provide for repaying neighbors who lend a helping hand while you are down and out. A helpful neighbor will refuse money; so the coverage should pay for a small token of your thanks: a set of screw drivers, Craftsman pliers or a case of 40-weight motor oil. (I have never known a man who could not use more screw drivers.)

Next Page

Insurance:
Evaluating Plan
Coverage
Wheelchairs
Disability
Lawsuits

See below to order the book!


Introduction | Decision Making | Design | Permits | Buying Materials | Demolition | Digging | Masonry | Framing | Electricity | Plumbing | Inspections | Roofing | Sheathing / Siding | Soffits | Insurance | Insulation | Fat Fireman Rule | Drywall | Finish Carpentry | Tile | Painting | Carpet | Done

About the Author:
W.J. Rayment built an addition on his house, and in the course of the project learned from his many mistakes. This on-line compendium is his effort to help you learn from his experience. The advice and stories are often humorous, sometimes silly, but always informative. for yourself or as a gift for family or friends.

Contact Us | Privacy Statement